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Now the New York Times reports Omarosa could have hundreds of tape-recorded conversation with members of Trump family and administration. Also on the Friday rundown: Groups call for more reforms in the Chicago Police decree; and the latest on Bears Ears Nat'l. Monument.

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LI South Shore Bays Hot Spots for Brown Tide: IBM Crafting Solution

PHOTO: While Long Islanders were able to avoid high surf at bay-side beaches over the 4th of July holiday, brown tides remain a persistent problem. Photo courtesy: The Nature Conservancy of Long Island.
PHOTO: While Long Islanders were able to avoid high surf at bay-side beaches over the 4th of July holiday, brown tides remain a persistent problem. Photo courtesy: The Nature Conservancy of Long Island.
July 7, 2014

NEW YORK CITY - With high surf advisories out during the long holiday weekend, many families likely turned to calmer waters along the bay-side beaches and inland waterways.

But many of those waters face a pesky recurring problem with brown tides and other algae blooms. The bay-side beaches that ring Long Island are popular with local communities because they're often within walking distance.

According to Carl LoBue, a Nature Conservancy senior marine scientist, Quantuck Bay is a particular hot spot for brown tide.

"It's the unfortunate thing with these little community beaches," said LoBue, "where people like to take their little kids and get to walk to. Those are the ones that are most impacted."

LoBue added that the shallow South Shore bays are the most prone to water quality problems, as they contain high levels of nitrogen from sewage runoff, and get poor mixing from ocean water.

Suffolk County is getting help from an IBM Smarter Cities award, which it received after a team of experts spent three weeks studying water quality problems there.

According to LoBue, management of the county's water is fragmented.

"We have department of public works dealing with our sewage infrastructure," said LoBue. "We have department of health dealing with our septic systems, the water authority dealing with water delivery. It's even fragmented within the county."

LoBue said IBM will make data sharing a big part of their proposed solution to get those agencies to work cooperatively on water quality.

"Their written report comes out at the end of July," LoBue said. "We hope that the task force that the governor's working on and the county executive will embrace this, and we can move forward, bringing the way we manage our water up to the 21st Century standards."

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NY