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Nevada Libraries Promoting Genealogy Services

PHOTO: Nevada libraries are promoting the availability of free resources to help people research their family histories. Photo credit: Town of Rehoboth, Mass.
PHOTO: Nevada libraries are promoting the availability of free resources to help people research their family histories. Photo credit: Town of Rehoboth, Mass.
August 26, 2014

HENDERSON, Nev. - Nevadans wanting to learn more about their family history may find the best available resources at their local library.

Anne Marie Hamilton-Brehm is a digital librarian with the Henderson District Public Libraries. She says reference librarians can provide the latest resources and guidance on how and where to best locate ancestry information.

"If you wanted to know about your family, you could look them up on our digital-collections website," she says. "You could go online to the resources we have on our website and find more information about your family."

According to Hamilton-Brehm, technology has revolutionized genealogy and ancestry search by putting so much of our family history online, making it much easier to locate. She says a common request is that many Americans try to determine if they had ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War.

Hamilton-Brehm says there are birth, death and marriage records as well as other historical documents available through local, state and federal government agencies. She says a local genealogical society helped her learn more about a family member.

"They helped me track down the death record of an ancestor of mine who was a prisoner of war during World War II," says Hamilton-Brehm. They found the record online in the National Archives' military records, and I would never have thought to look there because my ancestor was a civilian."

Beyond the local library, Hamilton-Brehm says the Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, and New York Public Library are especially helpful to beginning researchers.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NV