Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 19, 2018 


Efforts continue to quell the backlash over President Donald Trump’s changing statements on the Russia summit. Also on the Thursday rundown: protestors are out for Mike Pence’s visit to Missouri; and nobody wants to go, but one option is green burials.

Daily Newscasts

Florida's National Parks: Drone On Elsewhere

PHOTO: The days of being able to use an aerial drone to take photos or video at will inside a National Park in Florida, or anywhere in the nation, are over. Photo credit: National Park Service.
PHOTO: The days of being able to use an aerial drone to take photos or video at will inside a National Park in Florida, or anywhere in the nation, are over. Photo credit: National Park Service.
August 26, 2014

EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Fla. - Florida is home to 11 National Park Service (NPS) units, including the Everglades and Key Biscayne, but visitors won't be seeing any high-tech flying drones over Florida's National Parks any time soon.

A ban on aerial drones being used inside National Parks, primarily to capture photos and video, is now in full effect in Florida and nationwide. The National Park Service initiated the drone ban in late June, but gave park superintendents two months to implement the policy. Jeffrey Olsen with the Park Service says the decision came out of concern for the safety of people and animals.

"These devices often crash, and if somebody is standing in the way when one crashes, people are going to get hurt," says Olsen. "Drones have also been used to harass wildlife."

Despite the ban, drones may not be grounded for good. Olsen says the National Park Service will spend the next 18 months drafting rules for drone operation in parks, as well as deciding which areas to designate as appropriate for drone use. Eventually, the Park Service may also use the technology to help locate people stranded or injured at parks.

Olsen says the NPS hopes, with time, drone operators will gain more experience and responsibility in using the devices.

"It's a new activity and park rangers in the field could tell people didn't have very much or any experience with these unmanned aircraft."

Olsen says anyone cited for using an aerial drone inside a National Park could face a misdemeanor charge and a fine of up to $5,000.

Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - FL