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PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2018 


Lawyer Michael Avenatti arrested on a domestic violence charge. Also on the Thursday rundown: more testimony on the anti-protest bill; plus we will take you to the Dakotas to celebrate American Education Week.

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A Persistent Hunger in Massachusetts

GRAPHIC: While food insecurity in Massachusetts is below the levels in many other states, nearly eleven percent of all Commonwealth households are struggling to put food on the table. Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture.
GRAPHIC: While food insecurity in Massachusetts is below the levels in many other states, nearly eleven percent of all Commonwealth households are struggling to put food on the table. Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture.
September 8, 2014

BOSTON – Food insecurity will not loosen its grip on many Commonwealth households.

According to the latest government figures, one in nine Massachusetts households struggled, on average, with hunger over the years 2011-2013.

Among those households considered to be food insecure, 4 percent were considered to have very low food security.

The lack of improvement in the Commonwealth has Georgia Katsoulomitis, executive director of the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute, calling for an end to hand wringing and the start of action.

"To really focus and shine a light on the long term and the short term impacts of poverty in this country,” she stresses. “And I think it's really time for a movement."

A report last month from the Boston Federal Reserve zeroed in on the growth of poverty and the reliance on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and other key nutrition benefits among the suburban poor in New England.

Katsoulomitis says that report showed one out of four New England families in the suburbs now need SNAP and other safety net services.

"That tells us that poverty and hunger and food insecurity is spreading well beyond urban and rural areas and there is invisible poverty and invisible hunger throughout New England and throughout Massachusetts," she says.

Solutions, Katsoulomitis adds, will be found in convincing policymakers to take real initiatives.

"We need a movement and we need a serious dialogue on both sides of the aisle to focus on poverty and how to help people that are in poverty and not demonize them," she says.

Mark Scheerer, Public News Service - MA