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Stepped-Up Safety Requirements for Minnesota Child Care Settings

PHOTO: Understanding sleep safety is important in helping reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the major cause of death in the United States for infants ages one month to one year. Photo credit: Jessica Merz/Flickr.
PHOTO: Understanding sleep safety is important in helping reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the major cause of death in the United States for infants ages one month to one year. Photo credit: Jessica Merz/Flickr.
September 9, 2014

ST. PAUL, Minn. - With stronger requirements coming into effect this year on safety training for Minnesota child-care locations, providers across the state are now starting to plug into a new tool to meet that mandate.

Called Anytime Learning, the new training format was launched in July. Corey Woosley, professional development director with Child Care Aware of Minnesota, says around 200 providers have already taken the five classes being offered thus far.

"We're looking at what other things might be information driven," Woosley. "What else can we offer providers that they don't need to do the deep reflection, but they need the information."

The training available through Anytime Learning covers issues like safety and supervision and sudden infant death syndrome, which is the leading cause of death for U.S. children between the ages of one month and one year.

Woosley says being able to offer such trainings, accessible in every corner of the state, is especially important as the educational requirements for providers this year doubled from eight hours to 16 hours.

"What families can see is providers getting more education because they're not so stressed, they're not so drained, it's done on their own time and it's quality material." explains Woosley. "Currently, this material is all written by the Department of Human Services."

In Minnesota, about 65 percent of children ages 12 and younger are in some type of regular care arrangement where they spend an average of more than 20 hours a week.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - MN