Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 21, 2019 


G-7 meeting may move to Camp David; conservation groups sound alarm about acting BLM chief; NC suit aims to change solitary confinement policy there; questions about Amazon Ring coordination with police; and microbes might help in earthquakes.

2020Talks - October 21, 2019 


2016 candidate Hillary Clinton says Russia is "grooming" Rep. Tulsi Gabbard for a third-party run. And Sen. Bernie Sanders has biggest Democratic campaign event this season so far.

Daily Newscasts

It Takes More than a Seat Belt to Keep Kids Safe in a Car

GRAPHIC: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates the majority of child-safety seats are not installed properly in cars. Free car-seat inspections are being held at sites around Ohio as part of National Child Passenger Safety Week. Graphic courtesy American Academy of Pediatrics.
GRAPHIC: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates the majority of child-safety seats are not installed properly in cars. Free car-seat inspections are being held at sites around Ohio as part of National Child Passenger Safety Week. Graphic courtesy American Academy of Pediatrics.
September 15, 2014

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children in the U.S. but it takes more than clicking the seat belt to keep them safe. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention while the appropriate car or booster seat can reduce injuries by more than half, most are not used properly. Dawne Gardner, a state-certified child passenger technician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, says a child should ride in the correct seat for their weight and height, and should stay in a rear-facing seat until they outgrow it.

"When they turn them forward too soon, the child is open to internal injuries from the seat belts and the harnesses, because their bodies aren't strong enough to hold them in place during a collision," says Gardner.

Installing a car seat can be tricky, Gardner recommends having a trained technician take a look to ensure it's correct.

It's National Child Passenger Safety Week, and free car-seat checks are being offered around Ohio. Many fire or health departments and hospitals also offer free car-seat inspections on a monthly basis.

Decades ago, children were not required to use a safety seat, but Gardner says there are important reasons that has changed.

"Cars are different, speed limits are different, roads are different," she says. "As we follow the data, we know that seat belts and booster seats, forward-facing seats, and rear-facing seats save lives."

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates more than half the children killed in car crashes each year would be alive today if seat belt and child safety seat use were at 100 percent. Under Ohio law, children must ride in a car seat until age four and weigh at least 40 pounds. Kids ages four to eight must be in a booster seat until reaching a height of four feet, nine inches.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH