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PNS Daily Newscast - September 18, 2018 


Kavanaugh now expected to meet his accuser at an open hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. Also on the Tuesday rundown: An Albany rally calls for a million solar households; and #GetCaughtReading – a weeklong campaign for readers of all ages.

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Missourians Encouraged to "Make Strides" Against Breast Cancer

PHOTO: October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and the three "Making Strides Against Breast Cancer" events across the state this weekend are expected to raise $800,000 to help fight the disease. Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society.
PHOTO: October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and the three "Making Strides Against Breast Cancer" events across the state this weekend are expected to raise $800,000 to help fight the disease. Photo courtesy of American Cancer Society.
October 14, 2014

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Breast cancer awareness means more than just sporting a pink ribbon; it means knowing what the risk factors are and taking steps to reduce those within one's control.

That's the message from cancer experts, who urge Missourians to take charge of their breast health.

Kansas City breast surgeon and oncologist Dr. Anne Kobbermann says many women still don't understand that when it comes to breast cancer, the biggest risk factor is simply having breasts.

"The thing that I hear a lot when people come into my clinic is, 'But nobody in my family has breast cancer,'" she says. "And there are so many other things that can increase your risk. I think it's important for every woman to be conscientious and aware of their breasts, and be up-to-date with their screenings."

Kobbermann says women can reduce their breast cancer risk by staying close to their target body weight, getting 30 to 45 minutes of brisk activity several days per week, limiting alcoholic drinks to less than two per day, and avoiding hormone replacement therapy whenever possible.

According to Kobberman, there has been a great deal of recent progress in screening techniques and targeted treatment of breast cancer, but she says there is still much work to be done to find the root causes of the disease.

"In terms of what actually happens, that initial cell that changes, I think that's still a ways away," she says. "There's still a lot of ongoing research looking at that, and a lot of research money that's going specifically to look at breast cancer."

The American Cancer Society recommends Missouri women receive yearly clinical breast exams, perform self-exams once per month, and in most cases receive an annual mammogram after the age of 40.

On October 25th, three Making Strides Against Breast Cancer events will take place across Missouri: Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Jordan Valley Park in Springfield, and Forest Park in St. Louis.

Mona Shand, Public News Service - MO