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Boston Public Schools Join Meatless Mondays

Boston Public School students can now participate in Meatless Mondays in cafeterias.
Boston Public School students can now participate in Meatless Mondays in cafeterias.
November 3, 2014

BOSTON - Black bean burritos, garden fresh salads and protein packed chili are just a few of the options students at Boston Public Schools will now have in cafeterias for Meatless Monday. The school district joined the movement after working with the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and after hearing from over a 1,000 students and parents. Lee McGuire is chief communications officer at Boston Public Schools.

"This felt like a good time to join with the Humane Society and Meatless Monday just because it is one more option students can use to make sure they can have a healthy choice and get educated at the same time about the way to stay healthy every day," he says.

There are 128 schools in the Boston Public School system. McGuire says they serve about a million meals per year including breakfast, lunch and sometimes even dinner. He adds, many students are excited about the plan, and he won't be surprised if many students don't notice the options are meatless. Harvard and Walpole public schools are some of the others participating in Meatless Mondays.

Kristie Middleton, food policy manager at the HSUS says her organization advocates for more humane food choices, but adds there are also health and environmental components associated with eating less meat, and Meatless Monday is a great opportunity to help educate people.

"Students will also be seeing posters in cafeterias encouraging them to take a holiday from meat in order to do their part to save the environment and to eat healthier," she says.

Middleton says numerous studies show reducing meat or saturated fat in diets, by even 15 percent, can help reduce risk of diabetes, heart disease and obesity and lessen the environmental impacts associated with large-scale farming operations.

Monique Coppola, Public News Service - MA