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Inauguration yields swift action: Joe Biden becomes 46th president and Kamala Harris vice president -- the first woman, African-American, and person of South Indian descent in this role. Harris seats new senators; Biden signs slew of executive actions and gets first Cabinet confirmation through the Senate.

Poll: Voters Want Action on Climate Crisis

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PHOTO: A new poll conducted after the midterm elections indicates a majority of voters in six of the so-called battleground states want action on the climate crisis, regardless of which way they voted. The Sierra Club believes the same would hold true for Maine voters. Photo credit: pixabay
PHOTO: A new poll conducted after the midterm elections indicates a majority of voters in six of the so-called battleground states want action on the climate crisis, regardless of which way they voted. The Sierra Club believes the same would hold true for Maine voters. Photo credit: pixabay
November 24, 2014

PORTLAND, Maine – No matter which side of the political aisle they were on and no matter which way their elections went three weeks ago, voters in six of the so-called battleground states want elected office holders to work on the climate crisis, according to a Hart Research poll commissioned by the Sierra Club.

Melissa Williams, the Sierra Club’s national political director, says participants numbered about 500 voters in each of these states: Colorado, Iowa, Michigan, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

"Of course, every state is different, but the numbers across these states are so consistent that I don't think there's reason to think that it would be markedly different in other places," she says.

At least 64 percent of voters in each state said they want their senators to address the effects of climate change.

At least 63 percent said they favor candidates who accept the scientific consensus on climate change over those who do not.

Williams says President Barack Obama's plan to have the Environmental Protection Agency limit carbon emissions from power plants is broadly supported – the poll shows at least 64 percent of each state favors the Clean Power Plan.

"Support for this plan is extremely high, and it includes large majorities of Independents and many Republicans,” Williams stresses. “It's clear that the voters want action on this, and they support the President's plan – and that means the Senate should get behind that as well."

People were interviewed for the poll via home phone or mobile phone, between Nov. 6 and 10, immediately following the midterm elections.

Yale and George Mason Universities have also released a new report, saying two-thirds of U.S. adults support setting strict carbon dioxide emission limits on existing coal-fired power plants to reduce global warming and improve public health.


Mark Scheerer, Public News Service - ME