Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 22, 2018 


The Department of Justice bows to Trump demands – at least, in part. Also on the rundown: the latest Supreme Court ruling deemed a blow to worker’s rights; plus a solar program back by popular demand.

Daily Newscasts

Support for Action on Climate Crisis Crosses New Hampshire Party Lines

PHOTO: A new poll finds 66 percent of Granite State voters want to see Senator Jean Shaheen support legislation to address the effects of climate change. Photo credit: U.S. Senate.
PHOTO: A new poll finds 66 percent of Granite State voters want to see Senator Jean Shaheen support legislation to address the effects of climate change. Photo credit: U.S. Senate.
November 25, 2014

CONCORD, N.H. - Fresh off the midterm elections, a new poll finds broad support among Granite State voters - regardless of political stripe - for lawmakers to take action on climate change.

Melissa Williams, national political director with the Sierra Club, says no matter which party those polled identify with, a supermajority of New Hampshire voters want Senator Jean Shaheen to focus on efforts to protect communities from the effects of climate disruption.

"Senator Shaheen was one of the key senators actually running on energy issues, and 66 percent of voters said they wanted the senator to support legislation to address the effects of climate change," says Williams.

New Hampshire was one of six political "battleground" states polled.

The Hart Research poll commissioned by the Sierra Club found in all six battleground states, 63 percent of voters favored candidates who accept the scientific facts about climate change over those who do not. The other states polled were Colorado, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

Williams says the poll also found strong support among New Hampshire voters for the EPA's Clean Power Plan, which calls for a 20 percent reduction in power plant carbon emissions by the year 2030.

"In New Hampshire, 65 percent of voters favor the EPA's plan to limit carbon emissions from power plants," says Williams. "That includes a supermajority of independents and even 42 percent of Republicans."

The biggest margin in the New Hampshire poll went to the 69 percent of voters who are more likely to support a candidate who favors increased use of renewable energy over a candidate pushing to increase use of traditional energy.

Granite Staters who want to
sound off on the EPA plan can do so until December first when the comment period ends.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH