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The list of accusers against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh continues to swell. Also on the Tuesday rundown: Hurricane Florence SNAPs North Carolina to attention on the importance of food benefits; plus a new report says young parents need better supports.

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Report: Colorado River Adds $115 Billion to Nevada Economy

PHOTO: The Colorado River means millions of jobs and billions of dollars to Nevada's economy each year, according to a new report. Photo courtesy Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
PHOTO: The Colorado River means millions of jobs and billions of dollars to Nevada's economy each year, according to a new report. Photo courtesy Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
January 19, 2015

LAS VEGAS - Nevada's economy and the Colorado River are linked - to the point that one may not exist without the other. That's according to a new study from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

It concludes, the river contributed more than 1.4 million jobs and $115 billion to Nevada's economy last year. Dr. Timothy James, professor of economics at Arizona State University, worked on the study.

"No water in the West would basically wipe out the West in terms of economic activity in all of its forms - agricultural, industrial, residential, whatever. It would mean that we would just have a decimated economy really, and there would be no reason for us actually to be here."

James adds that each year, Colorado River water generates one-point-four trillion dollars and 16-million jobs across the seven Colorado Basin states: Nevada, Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming.

Eric Dominguez, the corporate director of facilities, engineering and sustainable operations at Caesars Entertainment, says as the Colorado River continues to experience drought, and the region's population continues to grow, conservation has become even more critical. He says Caesars is working to save water at its casinos every day.

"We installed about 12,000 low-flow shower heads. So your shower heads are using about 1.8 gallons per minute instead of 2.5 gallons per minute," says Dominguez. "So you save 30 percent on water use there."

The Colorado River stretches 1,450 miles from the central Rocky Mountains and flows southwest, across the Colorado Plateau to Lake Mead, before turning south into Mexico, where it empties into the Gulf of California.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NV