PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 27, 2021 


Biden executive orders address pollution and environmental justice; health professionals note a link between climate change and human health.


2021Talks - January 27 , 2021 


The Senate moves forward with Trump's impeachment trial; scholars question the legality of impeachment after an official is out of office.

35K Elephants Killed Yearly: U.S. Group Works to Save Them

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

PHOTO: U.S. wildlife agencies and animal rights groups are working to help prevent poaching half a world away. As the African elephant population dwindles, the U.S. plans to strengthen its ban on importing and purchasing ivory. Photo credit: Copyright K. Branon/IFAW; used with permission.
PHOTO: U.S. wildlife agencies and animal rights groups are working to help prevent poaching half a world away. As the African elephant population dwindles, the U.S. plans to strengthen its ban on importing and purchasing ivory. Photo credit: Copyright K. Branon/IFAW; used with permission.
March 30, 2015

RICHMOND, Va. – Close to 35,000 African elephants are killed every year for their tusks, according to some estimates, and U.S. wildlife experts are ringing the alarm bells in hopes the world will listen.

Peter LaFontaine, campaign officer for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) in Washington, says while China is the number one consumer of ivory, a lot of it also is trafficked and sold in the U.S., sometimes passed off as antique.

So, an effort is underway by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to implement what LaFontaine describes as a near complete ban on ivory.

"And not only would this create certainty for law enforcement officers, it would really draw a bright line for consumers, who otherwise have been sent mixed messages on what's legal and what's not," he explains.

For instance, some ivory products can be legally purchased if they were produced before 1976.

LaFontaine says a ban would close many of the loopholes. He says there are about 400,000 African elephants left – down from 10 million just a century ago.

LaFontaine stresses the effort to save elephants needs to be three-pronged – with more assistance on the ground to combat the poachers, working to put an end to the trafficking and corruption that surrounds the illegal trade, and curbing consumer demand for ivory, with laws as well as education.

"As soon as you get people to understand that every piece of ivory comes from a dead elephant, you've already made terrific headway into stopping the problem of buying," he points out.

Elephants are currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, but IFAW and other wildlife groups are trying to get their status changed to endangered.

This would mean greater restrictions, including an end to American trophy-hunters who kill an average of 400 elephants per year for sport.


Monique Coppola, Public News Service - VA