Sunday, January 23, 2022

Play

Despite a failed attempt in the U.S. Senate, more than 200 business owners call for federal reforms to strengthen election laws, and the U.S. Supreme Court deals another blow to abortion providers.

Play

President Biden gets cheers and jeers as he marks his first year in the White House, the Jan. 6 committee wants to hear from Ivanka Trump, and the Supreme Court rejects another challenge to the Texas abortion law.

Play

Expanded broadband akin to electrification in rural America 80 years ago; small Wyoming grocery store survives monopolization; revitalized Kansas town gets national recognition; and Montana's Native communities look for voter suppression work-arounds.

"Digital Detox" Retreat First of Its Kind in the U.S.

Play

Thursday, April 9, 2015   

PHOENICIA, N.Y. - The benefits of putting down the wireless devices are increasingly touted as good for physical and mental health, but it's sometimes difficult to unplug, especially for managers and executives.

There's help in the form of the first-ever Digital Detox retreat for executives in the U.S., taking place this week in upstate New York. Dr. Joseph Loizzo, executive director of the Nalanda Institute for Contemplative Science, is leading the retreat.

"Our institute really focuses on taking time-tested practices from traditional contemplative science techniques," says Loizzo. "From contemplative yoga, meditation, different kinds of practices, and sort of tailoring them to specific modern life challenges."

He says with personal stress and burnout at their highest points in 30 years, stress-related healthcare expenses costing American businesses $300 billion annually, and the escalating pace of information exchange, multi-tasking, and global business complexity, it's time to consider proven, innovative approaches and tools.

Frank Clegg is the former CEO of Microsoft Canada and now heads Canadians for Safe Technology. He says he's concerned about potential harm if wireless devices aren't used safely.

"There is no doubt any longer that holding the phone to your head, sticking it in your bra, putting it in your pants pocket, causes harm. Period," says Clegg.

He points to studies that have shown an increased risk of brain cancer with long-term, heavy cell phone use and the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer lists the radio frequency waves these devices emit as "possible carcinogens."

Clegg is also concerned about the stress for business leaders that comes with always being connected.

"You're always at work, you're always available, and I think you just don't have this down time," says Clegg. "We're starting to see now where people are almost addicted, but they're very connected and they feel they always have to be current; they can't miss an email, they can't miss a text message."

He urges executives to start their own detox program by taking a one-hour break from their technology.

Professor Robert Thurman, who holds an endowed chair in Indo-Tibetan Studies at Columbia University, will also be at the Mindfulness for Leadership Excellence retreat. He says it's important to have a spiritual component to life, whether through religion or a secular approach.

"Keep the mental and physical things in proportion, and then even the negative impacts that might occur there will be minimized, and one will have a satisfying life," says Thurman.

The Mindfulness for Leadership Excellence Retreat takes place April 9-12 at the Menla Mountain Retreat and Conference Center in Phoenicia, New York.


get more stories like this via email

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2018 to fill the seat previously held by Republican Jeff Flake. (Flickr)

Social Issues

A wave of new Arizona voters in the 2020 election changed the normally conservative state to one where progressive candidates and ideas have a fightin…


Environment

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to use federal funds for a project to help keep invasive carp out of the Great Lakes. It is proposing using …

Social Issues

Healthcare workers at an Oregon hospital have achieved what they say is a "win" after several strikes in recent months. Nearly 300 workers and …


Pennsylvania has over 300 million square feet of big-box building rooftops, which new research suggests could provide almost half the electricity that these buildings consume if they were outfitted with solar panels. (Adobe Stock)

Environment

As Pennsylvania continues to grow its solar-energy capacity, a new report found the roofs of big-box stores present a big opportunity to increase …

Social Issues

If Iowa wants to create healthier outcomes for its residents, advocates say there are steps policymakers can take right now to make it happen…

Over the course of the pandemic, North Dakota has received more than $350 million in federal aid to help struggling renters, but says it has sent back roughly 40% of that money unspent. (Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

North Dakota has returned a significant portion of the rental assistance provided by the federal government in the pandemic, and groups working …

Social Issues

Nearly 1,200 Hoosiers are about to have some of their student-loan debt forgiven, as part of a multistate settlement with the student-loan-servicing …

Social Issues

After a defeat on Wednesday, Democrats in the U.S. Senate say they'll keep trying to pass voting-rights legislation, and one Wisconsin group wants …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member- and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021