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Advocate: Politicians Should Not Try to Be Woman's OB-GYN Doctor

PHOTO: Saying such decisions should be made by a woman and her family in consultation with the best medical advice available, a number of Wisconsin women's groups are strongly opposed to proposed legislation that would prohibit abortions after the 20th week of pregnancy.
PHOTO: Saying such decisions should be made by a woman and her family in consultation with the best medical advice available, a number of Wisconsin women's groups are strongly opposed to proposed legislation that would prohibit abortions after the 20th week of pregnancy.
May 26, 2015

MADISON, Wis. – State lawmakers are likely to propose legislation that would ban abortions in Wisconsin after the 20th week, and Gov. Scott Walker says that if such a bill passes, he'll sign it.

A number of women's health advocacy groups are strongly opposed to such legislation, calling it invasive.

Julie Halverson, a Wisconsin Women's Network board member, says such a measure, which has passed in other states, is ill advised.

"It prevents doctors from providing quality and safe care to their patients,” she points out. “It is not based on sound science, and is not supported by the medical or the public health community.

“It puts state legislators – and not women or their doctors – in the driver's seat of a woman's pregnancy."

Supporters of such legislation say it protects women and unborn children, but Halverson disagrees.

"I don't see how this legislation protects people in this situation,” she states. “These are extremely delicate situations that only a family and a trained medical professional should be deciding."

Halverson stresses if we interfere with doctors doing their job, it opens the door to unsafe and uninformed medical practices.

According to Halverson, legislation like this is based on inaccurate medical information and actually puts women's lives at risk, rather than protecting them. She says it is not the state government's place, nor its right, to interfere with such private decisions.

"Personal medical decisions are best left to individuals and their families in consultation with the best medical advice available, and health care – not politics – should be driving decisions,” she states. “And only women and their doctors should be making these difficult and personal medical decisions, not politicians."


Tim Morrissey, Public News Service - WI