PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 7, 2020 


The State Attorney of NY moves to dissolve the NRA; an update on the potential wave of pandemic evictions.


2020Talks - August 7, 2020 


The Commission on Presidential Debates rejected the Trump's campaign for a fourth debate. Hawaii has a primary tomorrow, but there are only 8 vote service centers.

Minnesotans Support National Nutritional Standards in Schools

PHOTO: A new poll finds 76 percent of public school parents in Minnesota support requiring public schools in the state to meet the national nutrition standards for school meals. Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr.
PHOTO: A new poll finds 76 percent of public school parents in Minnesota support requiring public schools in the state to meet the national nutrition standards for school meals. Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr.
June 11, 2015

ST. PAUL, Minn. – A majority of Minnesotans in every region of the state, and of every political persuasion, believes schools need to do a better job of providing nutritious food options for their kids.

A new survey by Pew Charitable Trusts finds 76 percent of Minnesota parents and 82 percent of Minnesota voters supports the continued use of strong National Nutrition Standards for public school meals.

At Kelliher Public School in northeastern Minnesota, there's been a great response to the healthier options the school is offering.

Superintendent Tim Lutz says his school has added a fruit and veggie bar, and now allows students of all ages the opportunity to select their food choices.

"That change was very well received by students and parents, because students then could pick and choose what they wanted to eat from a selection that was provided for them, rather than being served something and then eating half of it or none of it and throwing half of it away," he explains.

While Lutz says it's difficult to attribute academic improvements directly to healthier school meals, he says attendance is better and test scores are up.

The poll also found that a majority of public school parents want nutritional standards to be met for other school foods, such as those sold in vending machines.

Lutz says those types of systemic changes beyond the cafeteria are also underway at Kelliher Public School, such as different offerings for fundraisers.

"Having healthier fundraisers that aren't necessarily foods anymore, like the cookie doughs or the candy bars, or if they are selling foods, they are healthier food,” he explains. “And our parties and celebrations where we used to give out cupcakes and ice cream, we're now focusing on healthier treats and snacks for students."

The Kelliher school also allows a full 30 minutes for school meals, and the survey found that a majority of parents believe it's important children are given enough time to eat.

Kelliher was recently honored with the Gold Award of Distinction under the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Healthier School Challenge.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - MN