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Indiana Grown: Getting Fresh, Local Foods to Indiana Tables

The new Indiana Grown initiative highlights food that comes from Indiana farms in order to connect local consumers and businesses to local producers. Credit: Natalie Maynor/Flickr
The new Indiana Grown initiative highlights food that comes from Indiana farms in order to connect local consumers and businesses to local producers. Credit: Natalie Maynor/Flickr
July 20, 2015

INDIANAPOLIS – Whether its chicken and pork or corn and strawberries, the list of foods produced in Indiana is extensive.

And the new Indiana Grown initiative is making locally grown foods more readily available to local consumers.

Program manager David King says with more than 60,000 farms, Indiana is the 10th largest farming state in the country. But he says Hoosiers are not feeding themselves.

"We purchase about $15 million worth of food in Indiana, but only about 10 percent comes from Indiana so that means we're purchasing 90 percent of the food we eat from other states,” he points out “And there's really no need to do that. We just need to change our focus."

The program is promoting Indiana products to residents, restaurants, markets and others.

King says any of four different labels could appear on certain foods, including 100 Percent Indiana, which means all ingredients must be produced in-state, and Prepared in Indiana, for which 100 percent of the production must be completed in the state.

King says there's a greater awareness among consumers of where their food originates, and demand for local products is at an all-time high.

He says with the Indiana Grown logo, shoppers will know their purchase is supporting agriculture in the state.

"They can certainly be sure that it's fresher, and certainly hadn't traveled halfway across the country,” he stresses. “It helps everyone, plus it reduces the carbon footprint, so it's also saving money on freight. So, it's good for the economy and good for the consumers."

Corn, soybeans, hogs, poultry and dairy products are Indiana's top five commodities.




Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - IN