Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 21, 2018 


We’re covering stories from around the nation including a victory for safety for nuclear site workers; President Trump chastises Republicans for not securing border wall funding; and a predicted spike in population fuels concerns about the need for care.

Daily Newscasts

Environmentalist: Clean Power Plan Will Mean a Healthier Wisconsin

The EPA's new Clean Power Plan will result in a huge reduction in carbon emissions from power plants and, according to the group Clean Wisconsin. Credit: Clean Wisconsin.
The EPA's new Clean Power Plan will result in a huge reduction in carbon emissions from power plants and, according to the group Clean Wisconsin. Credit: Clean Wisconsin.
August 5, 2015

MADISON, Wis. - The just-finalized Clean Power Plan from the Environmental Protection Agency places the first-ever limits on dangerous carbon pollution emissions from existing power plants, which the agency says will curb climate-change pollution and protect public health.

Keith Reopelle, senior policy director of the state's largest environmental group, Clean Wisconsin, said EPA estimates show the new limits will result in a healthier Wisconsin.

"For every dollar that will be spent in developing clean-energy resources under the Clean Power Plan," he said, "we will save $7 in health benefits, or we'll see $7 worth of benefits in better health among our citizens."

The EPA's proposed goal of carbon-emission reductions of 41 percent by 2030 for Wisconsin is very reasonable, said Reopelle, who maintained that Wisconsin is well-positioned to not only meet but to exceed the goal.

The Clean Power Plan pushes the starting date for other areas of change from 2020 to 2022, which Reopelle said will provide the state agencies and utilities greater flexibility in meeting the requirements.

"The state needs to pull together an implementation plan that will get us to reach those targets of carbon reductions and do it at the lowest cost possible," he said, "and we look forward to working with the state agencies and utilities to do that."

While critics of the plan say it's too drastic, too expensive to implement and will result in higher utility costs, Reopelle said exactly the opposite is true.

"The Clean Power Plan will provide a path to a reliable, safe and clean renewable-energy future," he said, "with lower energy bills, more jobs and, most importantly, a path that will provide our children with a healthier community to live in."

Tim Morrissey, Public News Service - WI