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Tech Jobs: The Place to Look For Higher Pay

Employment recruiter Robert Half International is predicting higher pay for many job categories, particularly in high-tech fields. Credit: Dodgerton Skillhause/morguefile.com
Employment recruiter Robert Half International is predicting higher pay for many job categories, particularly in high-tech fields. Credit: Dodgerton Skillhause/morguefile.com
September 8, 2015

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - New mobile app developers, data engineers, and wireless networking engineers all are expected to get a major wage bump next year, according to one of the world's largest recruiting firms.

In its new 2016 Salary Guide, Robert Half International projects starting pay in International Technology fields to increase five percent next year.

But too often, people sell themselves short in the hiring process, says managing principal and certified career development coach Barbara Barde. Particularly in highly competitive fields, she says, pay for many of these positions isn't a fixed number.

"Employers do expect some sort of negotiation with regards to salary, and you know, it's important that they understand what I call their professional 'value of contribution,' in order to successfully navigate through that negotiation phase."

Barde's advice to job-hunters is to research potential employers with an eye to how your specific strengths and skills will fit and can benefit that company, and then tailor your resume accordingly. The Salary Guide examines the hiring and pay outlook for more than 700 positions, and predicts higher pay for most.

State data shows South Dakota's unemployment rate has hovered near three and a half percent this summer. Chris Jansen, metro market manager with Robert Half International, expects continued job growth, and says more companies already are investing in full-time workers.

"For a college-degreed worker today that's over the age of 25, the unemployment rate is half the national average, at 2.6 percent," says Jansen. "In most instances, from an economic standpoint, that would be considered full employment. "

He suggests the best resumes show an intermingling of skills from different disciplines. His company also surveys workers, and found pay is still the primary factor that motivates change. "A bigger salary" is what 83 percent said it would take to get them to jump to another job. But almost half, 46 percent, would go for "more growth opportunities." Only 40 percent said "better work-life balance."

Jerry Oster, Public News Service - SD