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On World AIDS Day, New Mexico activists say more money is needed for prevention; ND farmers still navigate corporate land-ownership policy maze; Unpaid caregivers in ME receive limited financial grants.

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Secretary of State Antony Blinken urges Israel to protect civilians amid Gaza truce talks, New York Rep. George Santos defends himself as his expected expulsion looms and CDC director warns about respiratory illness as flu season begins.

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Congress has iced the Farm Bill, but farmer advocates argue some portions are urgent, the Hoosier State is reaping big rewards from wind and solar, and opponents react to a road through Alaska's Brooks Range, long a dream destination for hunters and anglers.

Feds Move to Protect Endangered Species from Fishing Nets

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Tuesday, September 15, 2015   

SAN DIEGO – The federal government put California swordfishermen on notice Monday, warning they'll be banned if they continue to inadvertently catch endangered species, whales, dolphins and sea turtles in their nets.

The Pacific Fishery Management Council set caps on the number of marine mammals that can be killed as bycatch when fishing boats use the mile-long, 200-foot-tall nets.

Ben Enticknap, campaign manager and senior scientist with the nonprofit group Oceana, notes the council also committed to putting inspectors or cameras on all gillnet boats by 2018.

"This is a really big deal," says Enticknap. "They're finally stepping up to say that's not going to be allowed anymore and, if the fishery does catch these species, they're going to shut them down."

Oceana estimates 885 marine mammals have died in gillnets over the past 10 years, trapped with the nets cutting into them, and drowned when they can't surface for air. The recommendations must still be approved by the National Marine Fisheries Service, which is expected to implement new regulations before next summer's fishing season.

Conservationists would like to see the 20 or so California swordfishing crews operating from San Diego to Monterey switch to less-damaging methods to nearby sea life. Enticknap says those include harpoons and deep-set buoy gear.

"It's more work to selectively target these swordfish, rather than just setting out a mile-long net and then just throwing everything over and keeping the swordfish," says Enticknap. "But it has to happen to protect our ocean wildlife and have a local, clean, sustainable fishery."

Swordfishing drift gillnets are already illegal in Oregon, Washington, parts of the Atlantic, the Mediterranean and even Russia.


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Social Issues

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A bill in Congress with a Connecticut House sponsor aims to reduce child labor in the United States. Called the "Children Harmed in Life-Threatening …


Social Issues

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Social Issues

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Environment

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Environment

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Health and Wellness

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November has been Diabetes Awareness Month - but heading into the holidays, people who are diabetic know they can't lose their focus on keeping it in …

Environment

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As world leaders gather in Dubai for the international conference on climate change, the City of Long Beach is acting on multiple fronts to help the …

Environment

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