PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 5, 2021 


New rules should speed large-scale clean-energy projects in NY; Texas' Gov. Abbott tries to shift COVID blame to release of "immigrants."


2021Talks - March 5, 2021 


A marathon Senate session begins to pass COVID relief; Sanders plans a $15 minimum wage amendment; and work continues to approve Biden's cabinet choices.

Halloween Tricky for Ohio Children’s Teeth

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

Credit: Mats Hagwell/Flickr
Credit: Mats Hagwell/Flickr
October 28, 2015

Columbus, OH - With sugar being a major contributor to cavities, Halloween is a time that makes many dental health providers cringe. But experts say Ohio children can maintain good oral health while enjoying trick-or-treating. Comments from Beth Tronolone (tron-AH-loan), hygienist and past-president, Ohio Dental Hygienists Association.

With all the sugary loot filling trick-or-treat bags, some dental experts say Halloween is a great time to remind little ghosts and goblins about good oral health care habits. Beth Tronolone, former president of the Ohio Dental Hygienists' Association, explains that the sugar in candy causes the bacteria to make acid that breaks down tooth enamel leading to decay.


"Kids get a lot of dental pain because of that and then they may miss school. So when we do screenings, the number one problem is tooth decay; we see that's the number one issue when we meet with kids."

Tronolone recommends avoiding candy or sweets that stay in the mouth for a long time and are sticky, along with only eating candy with meals. She adds brushing twice a day and flossing is essential in the prevention of tooth decay, as well as regular cleanings from a dental hygienist or dentist.

According to the American Dental Association, regular dental visits can prevent problems and catch them when they are easy to address. But Tronolone says for too many kids, time, money and distance make seeing a dentist tricky.



"In many communities dentists are scarce. So we would love for hygienists to be able to get out to outlying areas and work without the presence of a dentist. We can do that but there's a lot of red tape."

She also says dental therapists, who work under the supervision of a dentist could help to provide care in underserved communities. They are not currently licensed to practice in Ohio, but dental therapists are approved in several other states including Minnesota and Alaska. There are 84 Dental Care Health Professional Shortage Areas in Ohio.

With all the sugary loot filling trick-or-treat bags, some dental experts say Halloween is a great time to remind little ghosts and goblins about good oral health care habits. More from Mary Schuermann.

Mary Schuermann reporting.

Reach Tronolone at 419-705-6724.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH