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PNS Daily News - December 11, 2019 


U.S. House to vote on two articles of impeachment; $1.4 trillion in planned oil & gas development said to put the world in "bright red level" of climate crisis; anti-protest legislation moves forward in Ohio; "forest farming" moves forward in Appalachia; and someone's putting cowboy hats on pigeons in Nevada.

2020Talks - December 11, 2019 


18 years ago today, China joined the WTO. Now, China's in a trade war with the U.S. Also, House Democrats and the Trump administration made a deal to move forward with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement.

Michigan a Top Dog in Animal-Protection Laws

Michigan's animal protection laws are hailed in a new report. (hrikken/morguefile)
Michigan's animal protection laws are hailed in a new report. (hrikken/morguefile)
December 17, 2015

LANSING, Mich. – Michigan is a top dog for animal protection laws, according to a new report from the Animal Legal Defense Fund.

The annual list examines which of the 50 states are serious about animal welfare.

Lora Dunn, an attorney with the organization, says Michigan ranked fifth for having felony penalties for a variety of situations including cruelty, neglect, animal fighting and sexual assault.

"In Michigan, courts also may order the forfeiture of abused animals upon conviction,” she points out. “And also the courts may order mental health evaluations or counseling for offenders. "

Dunn notes that every state has room to improve, even those at the top.

Unlike many other states highlighted in the report, Michigan lacks legislation that allows animals to be included in protective orders in cases of domestic violence.

Illinois ranked first for the eighth year in a row, and Kentucky remained the worst state for its ninth consecutive year.

Dunn says Michigan could also improve animal welfare by mandating cost of care recovery for agencies that assist seized animals that had been abused.

"It's really important in these cases to get some of those costs of care that really rack up to be exorbitant amounts, to get those costs back to care-giving agencies so they can continue to help other animals in need," she states.

Other potential improvements listed in the report include the creation of an animal-abuser registry and mandatory reporting of suspected animal abuse by veterinarians.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - MI