Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Holloman AFB to House Central American Refugee Children

Holloman Air Force Base will host some 400 refugee children from Central America starting in mid-January while federal officials place them with family members in the United States or in foster homes. (U.S. Air Force)
Holloman Air Force Base will host some 400 refugee children from Central America starting in mid-January while federal officials place them with family members in the United States or in foster homes. (U.S. Air Force)
December 31, 2015

ALAMOGORDO, N.M. - Beginning in mid-January, Holloman Air Force Base in southern New Mexico will become the temporary home for about 400 refugee children from Central America. The Department of Health and Human Services and other federal agencies are in charge of the program, a result of the recent increase in the number of unaccompanied minors crossing the border into the United States.

Mike Espritu, director of the Chamber of Commerce in nearby Alamogordo, said local groups are getting ready to assist when the children arrive.

"We've already had one meeting with some local leaders and it appears the community is willing to do what it can, to do what's right for the children," he said. "Because at the end of the day, it's going to take care of those young people, no matter who they are."

At Holloman, an HHS spokeswoman said, the children will be provided with food, health care and a place to sleep. The goal will be to help them locate relatives in the United States or put them in temporary foster care. They eventually will be given court hearings to decide if they can stay in the country.

Espritu said he is aware that other refugee facilities have drawn protests and controversy, but he hopes to avoid that.

"One of my goals is to be extremely transparent with our community and those around the nation that are watching," he said. "My goal is to get the word out there, because we're not keeping any secrets."

He said Holloman officials are remodeling what used to be the 4th Space Surveillance Squadron building to house the refugees. Officials say children will begin arriving around Jan. 15, and they have no timeline for how long the facility will be needed.

Mark Richardson, Public News Service - NM