Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - UPDATE - November 20, 2018 


The death toll rises in a deadly shooting at a Chicago hospital. Also on the Tuesday rundown: community health centers rise to the challenge after wildfires; plus food inspectors can keep your Thanksgiving meal hearty and healthy

Daily Newscasts

Failure to Expand Medicaid Leaves Many Missourians Uninsured

States that expanded Medicaid had greatly reduced rates of uninsured workers, while states that did not, such as Missouri, showed half as much progress. (familiesusa.org)
States that expanded Medicaid had greatly reduced rates of uninsured workers, while states that did not, such as Missouri, showed half as much progress. (familiesusa.org)
February 5, 2016

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - A report released this week by Families USA shows states that expanded Medicaid had, on average, a 25 percent reduction in the rate of uninsured workers.

But since Missouri was one of eight states that has not expanded Medicaid since 2014, the decline was only 13 percent. Dee Mahan, director of medical advocacy for Families USA, says the failure to expand Medicaid put Missouri behind neighboring states.

"So if you compare how Missouri did with two of its neighbors who did expand, Kentucky and Iowa, you can really see what the difference is," says Mahan. "Iowa had a 31 percent decrease. Kentucky, 36 percent decrease in working uninsured."

Overall, the eight states that did expand Medicaid last year saw reductions in the rate of uninsured workers drop by 30 percent or more.

Beginning in 2014, states had the chance to extend Medicaid eligibility to nearly all individuals with incomes at or below 138 percent of poverty. In most states that did not extend coverage, many individuals are left with no option for affordable health insurance. Mahan says their survey of all 50 states leads to a clear conclusion.

"So really, when we look at the way the states lined up, the only thing that we could see was Medicaid expansion," she says. "Yes, there are economic differences between states. But in terms of whether you did better than the national average, I think it really is an issue that Kentucky and Iowa expanded Medicaid."

The federal government pays 100 percent of the expansion costs through this year. Beginning in 2017, the federal share gradually declines until it reaches 90 percent in 2020, and stays at that level in future years.

Jeff Stein, Public News Service - MO