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Anti-Violence Group: Assault Weapons Ban Won't Be Overturned

Gun rights supporters will get another chance to argue about overturning Maryland's assault weapons ban. (iStockphoto/Ultra1s)
Gun rights supporters will get another chance to argue about overturning Maryland's assault weapons ban. (iStockphoto/Ultra1s)
February 8, 2016

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Maryland lawmakers passed the sweeping Firearms Safety Act after the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Newtown, Conn.

But the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has now decided a lower court was wrong when it upheld the state’s ban on assault rifles and it has sent the case back to the lower court for further review.

Vincent DeMarco, president of Marylanders to Prevent Gun Violence, says it was the wrong decision, but doesn't think it will be upheld. He is pushing for a universal background check across the country.

"That is something which will prevent gun violence,” he states. “We definitely need national laws, but states that have these kinds of measures have lower gun deaths."

Gun rights advocates applauded the decision, calling it an important victory for the Second Amendment.

The National Rifle Association released a statement saying Maryland's law affects the constitutional right to possess firearms for self-defense and home protection.

DeMarco says the most important thing is that the gun lobby didn't challenge Maryland's fingerprinting rule, which applies to all gun buyers.

"Evidence shows that when a state does this, when it requires people to go through these steps, it dramatically reduces guns getting into the wrong hands," he points out.

Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh says the assault weapons ban is a common sense law designed to keep communities safe and reduce gun violence, and says he will appeal the court's decision.


Veronica Carter, Public News Service - MD