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PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2018 


Lawyer Michael Avenatti arrested on a domestic violence charge. Also on the Thursday rundown: more testimony on the anti-protest bill; plus we will take you to the Dakotas to celebrate American Education Week.

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Justice's Death Leaves Questions about Immigrants' Case

Immigrants who might be affected by the programs known as DACA and DAPA are especially concerned about the future of a U.S. Supreme Court case after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. (Avidcreative/iStockphoto)
Immigrants who might be affected by the programs known as DACA and DAPA are especially concerned about the future of a U.S. Supreme Court case after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. (Avidcreative/iStockphoto)
February 17, 2016

BALTIMORE - Advocates for immigrants' rights are working through the implications of the unexpected vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court, trying to determine how it affects a case that could decide the legal status of millions of undocumented immigrants.

The passing of conservative Justice Antonin Scalia leaves a court that could split 4-4 on the constitutionality of President Obama's 2012 executive order, which granted temporary work permits to undocumented parents of American citizens and legal residents, and to some people brought here as children.

"It has all kinds of implications for us," said Sulma Arias, field director for the Fair Immigration Reform Movement, "Either it goes back to that same circuit court; however, it's a decision that will eventually come back to the Supreme Court."

If the court splits down the middle, the lower-court decision that put the programs known as DACA and DAPA on hold would stand. Arias said she thinks the case then would be appealed once again. By that time, the high court would have a new justice, confirmed during the next administration. Arias said the legal battle underscores the importance of the presidential race.

"I think the community is very much in a fighting spirit about what this election means to us, come Nov. 8," she said.

The current case is set to be argued in April and a decision is expected in June.

Information about the executive order is online at dhs.gov.

Veronica Carter, Public News Service - MD