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Environmental Scorecard Rates Nevada Leaders

Nevada's leadership in Washington, D.C., gets mixed reviews on an annual Environmental Scorecard from the League of Conservation Voters. (Alan O'Neill)
Nevada's leadership in Washington, D.C., gets mixed reviews on an annual Environmental Scorecard from the League of Conservation Voters. (Alan O'Neill)
February 25, 2016

CARSON CITY, Nev. - Nevada's delegation in Washington, D.C., gets mixed results on the annual Environmental Scorecard, just released by the League of Conservation Voters, splitting down party lines.

The scorecard says Senator Dean Heller voted "pro-environment" just eight percent of the time.

Democratic Representative Dina Titus got a 94 percent rating, whereas Republicans Joe Heck, Mark Amodei and Cresent Hardy got percentages of six, three and zero, respectively, for their records on the Clean Power Plan, Clean Water Act, Keystone Pipeline and public-lands initiatives.

Kyle Davis, policy consultant with the Nevada Conservation League, says his group did see one small ray of hope in 2015.

"There was a bill at the end of last year that had extension for tax credits for solar and wind energy, and Senator Heller was certainly instrumental in making that happen," says Davis. "But unfortunately, it was packaged up in a bill that ended the ban on oil exports."

The scorecard also criticizes Representative Hardy for his amendment to the spending bill that would have undercut the President's ability to create new national monuments.

The amendment was approved but then pulled from the final bill. Senator Harry Reid's record was not rated because, as Senate Minority Leader, he often doesn't vote.

The report also faults Representative Mark Amodei for sponsoring a bill to greatly reduce public review of hard-rock mining activities on public lands, which has passed the House but has not yet been considered in the Senate.

Davis hopes voters take note in November.

"Ever since the Republicans took over the House, there have just been multiple attempts to roll back environmental laws," he says. "And we're going to be pretty active in the 2016 elections because, especially on issues like climate change, we can't afford to wait around."

All members of the House of Representatives face reelection every two years, so Amodei, Hardy, Heck and Titus all will be on the November ballot. Senator Reid is retiring, and Senator Heller us up for reelection in 2018.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - NV