Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 21, 2018 


We’re covering stories from around the nation including a victory for safety for nuclear site workers; President Trump chastises Republicans for not securing border wall funding; and a predicted spike in population fuels concerns about the need for care.

Daily Newscasts

Groups Urge Presidential Candidates to Support Great Lakes Restoration

Wisconsin relies on the Great Lakes for recreation, tourism, drinking water and jobs. A diverse group of leaders wants all the presidential candidates to commit to restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. (epa.gov)
Wisconsin relies on the Great Lakes for recreation, tourism, drinking water and jobs. A diverse group of leaders wants all the presidential candidates to commit to restoring and protecting the Great Lakes. (epa.gov)
March 10, 2016

MADISON, Wis. - A diverse group of business and conservation leaders is urging all the presidential candidates to commit to restoring and protecting the Great Lakes, a resource that provides drinking water to more than 40 million people and jobs for millions more.

Jordan Lubetkin is spokesman for the Healing Our Waters Great Lakes Coalition.

He says it's important for all candidates to support programs that are working.

"We're seeing results that are helping the environment and the economy, but there's more work to do and to continue, and that's why presidential leadership is so important," says Lubetkin.

Kathryn Buckner, president of the Council of Great Lakes Industries, says her group supports sustainable development in the Great Lakes region.

"And we've made a lot of progress as a region up to this point restoring the Great Lakes," Buckner says. "We continue to support and advocate for restoration funding and also restoration programming because these programs are restoring the lakes, but also helping to promote a vital bi-national Great Lakes economy."

The groups are asking all presidential candidates to support a platform that maintains at least $300 million per year in federal investment to protect and restore the Great Lakes, and to better the region's economy.

Forty million people across Wisconsin, the U.S., and Canada rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water, and Lubetkin points out the ongoing crisis in Flint, Michigan, has drawn attention to the importance of protecting the Great Lakes.

"Every year we see sewage contamination hurt our waters," says Lubetkin. "We have old, antiquated waste water infrastructure. A lot of the communities and cities in the Great Lakes have infrastructure that are decades if not over a hundred years old. They need to be fixed, repaired, or replaced."

Buckner calls the Great Lakes a huge economic engine, and says the next president should see protecting the lakes as an opportunity.

"The lakes themselves, the region, because the lakes exist here, fuel the North American economy, really," Buckner says. "And the next president would really do well to look forward into the future and see this an asset that needs to be protected and restored."

Tim Morrissey, Public News Service - WI