Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 21, 2018 


We’re covering stories from around the nation including a victory for safety for nuclear site workers; President Trump chastises Republicans for not securing border wall funding; and a predicted spike in population fuels concerns about the need for care.

Daily Newscasts

Human Trafficking Victims: Not Just the Street Kids

Those fighting to stop human trafficking say everyone needs to learn to spot the signs that a young person has fallen victim to the crime. (fbi.gov)
Those fighting to stop human trafficking say everyone needs to learn to spot the signs that a young person has fallen victim to the crime. (fbi.gov)
March 31, 2016

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. - Human trafficking was put into the spotlight in Indiana during the Super Bowl of 2012 in Indianapolis when dozens of prostitutes were arrested and many told police they'd been forced into it.

State Rep. Wendy McNamara says it opened a lot of eyes because many, herself included, didn't realize human trafficking was happening in Indiana.

Since then, several pieces of legislation to toughen the laws against human slavery have been approved, including one this session by McNamara that says anyone arrested for human trafficking has to be placed on the sex offender registry.

"What it does is give the community peace of mind," she says. "Because you can look up the sex offender registry and see who's in your neighborhood and that sort of person will not be permitted to be around kids, schools things like that."

McNamara says about one new human trafficking case is opened in Indiana every month. According to the watchdog group the Polaris Project, around 21 million people are victims of modern day slavery around the world.

McNamara says we think of victims as those in other countries, or street kids, but it could be a girl forced into prostitution at a local truck stop, or a man working in a restaurant kitchen, stripped of his passport and held against his will.

"Anybody that might look vulnerable, it might be somebody that they're going to come after, and if a loved one is threatened I think just about any child would be willing to do something to take care of their family if they knew that their family would be hurt in one way or another," says McNamara. "And that's what these traffickers do, they threaten family members."

McNamara says more legislation is needed to stiffen penalties against these modern day slavers, but even more important is education.

She says everyone needs to be taught to look for signs so kids can be protected.

Veronica Carter, Public News Service - IN