Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 18, 2018 


Giuliani says Trump will likely start preparing for a sit-down with Robert Mueller. Also on the rundown: A new report says SNAP changes would require a massive expansion of bureaucracy; and in the West, there's a win for sage grouse.

Daily Newscasts

New Data Renews Calls for Flint Home Water Delivery

There are Flint residents who struggle to access bottled water, with some lacking transportation to distribution centers. (taliesin/Morguefile)
There are Flint residents who struggle to access bottled water, with some lacking transportation to distribution centers. (taliesin/Morguefile)
April 13, 2016

LANSING, Mich. - The water crisis in Flint is not going away just yet, as new data indicates the water still is unsafe to drink. Marc Edwards, the Virginia Tech researcher who first brought Flint's water problem to light, released testing results on Tuesday that show all homes in the city should be considered at risk for high levels of lead.

Sarah Tallman, an attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council, said that while the levels are lower than when tested last summer, they still are too high.

"More than 10 percent of the homes sampled are still above what's called the federal action level for lead, that's 15 parts per billion mark," she said. "This data indicates that Flint's water system is still in violation of the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act."

Chemicals that can help eliminate lead and bacteria were added to the water system, but Edwards noted that regular use of the water is needed to speed up the recovery process. While the water is not safe for drinking, it has been declared OK to use for bathing and showering.

Tallman contended that the findings affirm the need for home water delivery for every Flint household, as requested in a recent federal court order from the NRDC and others. As the crisis persists, she said, Flint residents struggle to access bottled water, with some lacking transportation to distribution centers.

"It's critically important for the residents to have reliable access to safe water alternatives in the interim," she said, "so that they have safe water to cook with, to drink with, to make coffee with every day."

The request for home water delivery was filed by the NRDC, the ACLU of Michigan, Concerned Pastors for Social Action and Flint resident Melissa Mays. The city of Flint and state leaders have not yet responded to the court request, but are required to do so this month. The request is online at nrdc.org.

Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - MI