Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 19, 2018 


Efforts continue to quell the backlash over President Donald Trump’s changing statements on the Russia summit. Also on the Thursday rundown: protestors are out for Mike Pence’s visit to Missouri; and nobody wants to go, but one option is green burials.

Daily Newscasts

Report: South Dakota's Air Quality Gets Mixed Results

A new measure of ozone and particle air pollution shows parts of South Dakota are becoming unhealthy for sensitive groups, such as people living with asthma. (iStockphoto)
A new measure of ozone and particle air pollution shows parts of South Dakota are becoming unhealthy for sensitive groups, such as people living with asthma. (iStockphoto)
April 22, 2016

PIERRE, S.D. - For the most part, air quality in South Dakota is earning passing marks in the new State of the Air report from the American Lung Association.

Eight South Dakota counties with air-quality monitors earned at least a "C" grade in regard to particle pollution. And Rapid City tied for the 16th cleanest city in the nation for relatively low levels of dust, soot and smoke in the air.

But Robert Moffitt, director of media relations for the American Lung Association, says some parts of the state are seeing higher levels of ozone pollution.

"Generally, the grades have been pretty good," Moffitt says. "The one exception is in the Sioux Falls area. They had six air-quality alerts for ozone. So, that's the worst grade for ozone in the state of South Dakota."

The report provides a snapshot of South Dakota's air quality from 2011 to 2013. It also says a little more than half of all Americans are living in counties with potentially unhealthy levels of air pollution.

Moffitt says ozone is the most widespread pollutant in the U.S., and one of the most dangerous.

"Now, ozone in the upper atmosphere is great, it helps protect the planet from harmful ultraviolet rays," says Moffitt. "But ozone near the ground is not great at all. It is is a lung irritant. It's very much like getting a sunburn on the inside of your lungs."

To help reverse the effects of air pollution, the American Lung Association suggests South Dakota lawmakers should come up with ideas to meet the lower emissions targets laid out in the federal Clean Power Plan.


Brandon Campbell, Public News Service - SD