PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 15, 2021 


President Biden sets a date certain to end America's longest war, and more information could be the decider for some reluctant to get the COVID vaccine.


2021Talks - April 15, 2021 


With overwhelming bipartisan support, the Senate takes up anti-Asian American hate crimes legislation, and President Biden officially announces a full military withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Texas Teachers Say Ruling Doesn't Settle School Funding Issues

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

A recent Texas Supreme Court ruling means school districts will have to wait until the 2017 legislative session for any changes to the state's school funding plan. (morguefile)
A recent Texas Supreme Court ruling means school districts will have to wait until the 2017 legislative session for any changes to the state's school funding plan. (morguefile)
 By Mark Richardson, Public News Service - TX - Producer, Contact
May 23, 2016

AUSTIN, Texas - Teachers and other educators are raising concerns that a recent Texas Supreme Court ruling on the state's school funding system lets the Legislature off the hook for fixing it.

The state's high court found the system to be flawed but constitutional, leaving no mandate for state lawmakers to come up with a better system.

Lonnie Hollingsworth Junior, general counsel with the Texas Classroom Teachers Association, says while the court outlined specific problems with the current system, it did not order elected officials to make changes.

"It has usually taken a court ruling in the past to push the Legislature to do what they needed to do, which was to fund the public schools in an equal and equitable and an adequate fashion," says Hollingsworth. "But at this point, they don't have that hanging over their heads."

A state district court ruled the current finance system unconstitutional in 2014, saying it caused major disparities between property-rich and property-poor districts.

Hollingsworth says the state Supreme Court's ruling set that aside, meaning the inequities will remain and that Texas property owners will continue to be burdened by ever-higher property taxes.

Hollingsworth says in recent years, the Legislature has cut school funding at the state level, leaving local districts to come up with the funds to cover costs. However, he says local officials' hands are often tied by laws blocking tax-rate increases without voter approval.

"If you look through the court decision, it enumerates all the ways that our current system is deficient and it goes through and outlines it, and says while the system is arcane, not perfect and needs changes, it's the Legislature's duty to fix it," says Hollingsworth.

Republican Gov. Greg Abbott hailed the ruling, saying it will prevent the courts from "micro-managing" the state's school systems.

The Legislature is not scheduled to reconvene until January of next year.

Best Practices