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Experts: Don't Spend the Summer Sitting Still

Parents are being urged to keep kids running, jumping and playing to prevent poor posture, and muscle weakness. (Credit: Kevin Patrick Allen)
Parents are being urged to keep kids running, jumping and playing to prevent poor posture, and muscle weakness. (Credit: Kevin Patrick Allen)
June 6, 2016

COLUMBIA, Mo. - It may sound like a joke or an insult, but Dormant Butt Syndrome affects millions of Americans.

It's a weakness of the gluteal muscles caused by repetitive motions, or by sitting still for too long.

Wexner Medical Center physical therapist Chris Kolba says for athletes, if the buttock muscles aren't strong, it can lead to other injuries.

"When that glute muscle isn't working to its maximum efficiency, it decreases our ability to absorb shock," says Kolba. "It can lead to various things like back pain, hip pain, knee pain, muscle strains, things of that nature."

Dormant Butt Syndrome also happens when we sit still too long.

He says younger people are beginning to experience hip and back pain at an earlier age because they're not moving around enough; they're texting, web surfing or watching videos.

Kolba says our bodies are meant to move, but technology has created a society of sedentary people.

He's especially worried about kids because they aren't outside running, jumping and playing as much as they used to.

"They're going to have poor posture, they're going to have poor movement patterns, they're going to have weak muscles, and typically if they're unactive kids, they a lot of times may grow up to be unactive adults," he says.

A huge percentage of of American adults get less than 30 minutes of exercise a day, which is the minimum recommended amount based on federal guidelines.

Research from the University of Missouri suggests certain genetic traits may predispose people to being more or less motivated to exercise and remain active.

Veronica Carter, Public News Service - MO