PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 12, 2021 


Montanans get to weigh in on firearms on college campuses, and Washington state addresses carbon pollution from the building sector.


2021Talks - May 12, 2021 


Senators Schumer and McConnell duel over voting reforms, the GOP divide over Trump could widen, and a pipeline hack spurs cybersecurity concerns.

CDOT Targets "Pokemon Go" Players, Other Distracted Drivers

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

The Colorado Department of Transportation is alerting motorists to the dangers of distracted driving. (Intel Free Press/Wikimedia Commons)
The Colorado Department of Transportation is alerting motorists to the dangers of distracted driving. (Intel Free Press/Wikimedia Commons)
 By Eric Galatas - Producer, Contact
July 29, 2016

DENVER - "Beware the Pokemon" signs went up along Colorado highways this week, warning motorists not to game and drive. It's part of the Colorado Department of Transportation's (C-DOT) Killer Habit campaign to reduce distracted driving in the state, which caused more than 15,000 accidents and 68 fatalities in 2015.

Sam Cole, safety communications manager for C-DOT, said while Pokemon may be a craze right now, the agency doesn't want people to go crazy.

"It's more or less an obsession with some people," he said. "We just hope they have enough common sense to put down the game when they're driving. We know that there was a police cruiser in Baltimore, Maryland, that was rear-ended by somebody who was on his phone playing Pokemon."

The augmented-reality game allows players to search for virtual creatures that appear on their smartphones superimposed onto real-life locations. There have been several media reports of Pokemon-related accidents, including some later revealed as hoaxes, but Cole said so far, no incidents have been reported in Colorado, and the C-DOT campaign aims to keep it that way.

A national survey by the Center for Internet and Technology Addiction found while 98 percent of respondents know distracted driving is dangerous, nearly 75 percent admit to having done it. Cole said from law enforcement reports, distracted drivers sound a lot like drunk drivers.

"The car is weaving along the roadway, speeds are erratic," he said. "And also, somebody's reaction time can be delayed, obviously, if they're distracted. When you're driving a vehicle, two-ton vehicle down the road, you have an enormous responsibility."

Cole said kicking a distracted-driving habit could save a life. C-DOT is challenging Coloradans to lock their phones away, starting with their next trip, and make it to their destination without touching it once.

Best Practices