Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 14, 2018. 


Hate crimes are on the rise in the United States. Also on the Wednesday rundown: A big hearing in Denver on EPA's proposed rollback of methane limits; plus find out about "Give to the Max Day."

Daily Newscasts

Study: Educators Grapple with So-Called “Trump Effect” On Campus

A new report says the rhetoric of the presidential campaign is causing stress and even an increase in bullying among the nation's students. (Wikimedia Commons)
A new report says the rhetoric of the presidential campaign is causing stress and even an increase in bullying among the nation's students. (Wikimedia Commons)
October 19, 2016

LAS VEGAS - A new study suggests that divisive campaign rhetoric is frightening students, particularly those who fear that undocumented family members could be deported.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center report, "The Trump Effect: The Impact of The Presidential Campaign on Our Nation's Schools," teachers have noted an increase in bullying of students whose races, religions or nationalities have been targeted on the campaign trail.

Ruben Murillo Jr., president of the Nevada State Education Association, said he has heard many stories of clashes between students over the election because kids pick up on what their parents say and repeat it at school.

"A 25-year music teacher said a student approached minority students and told them, 'My parents are voting Trump. And when he wins, you will leave the next day,' " Murillo said.

Another teacher from a Las Vegas middle school, where many of the students are African immigrants, reported that the kids are stressed when the CNN Student News reports on the election, and some have asked that it be turned off. Some teachers report an uptick in hostile attitudes toward Muslim children, similar to what happened after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorism attacks.

U.S. Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., said the tenor of the debates has sunk to a new low.

"It's a terrible situation when parents don't even want their children to watch the debates or the Trump rallies that are covered on the news," she said, "because they're afraid of the low level of the language that's being used."

The debate coming up tonight at UNLV poses a special problem. The report surveyed 2,000 teachers from across the United States and found many high school civics teachers are in a quandary: They aren't comfortable making usual election-year assignments to watch and analyze the presidential debates.

The study is online at splcenter.org.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - NV