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PNS Daily Newscast - September 25, 2018 


The list of accusers against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh continues to swell. Also on the Tuesday rundown: Hurricane Florence SNAPs North Carolina to attention on the importance of food benefits; plus a new report says young parents need better supports.

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Community Rallies to Help ID Family Deal with Double Tragedy

Kristen Worthington and her son Nicholas of Boise were both diagnosed with cancer this year, only months apart. (Courtesy of Rick Worthington)
Kristen Worthington and her son Nicholas of Boise were both diagnosed with cancer this year, only months apart. (Courtesy of Rick Worthington)
July 20, 2017

BOISE, Idaho – In February, Rick Worthington's wife Kristen found out she had breast cancer.

Kristen was caught off-guard by the diagnosis and shortly after her 43rd birthday, the primary tumor was removed.

But the Worthingtons were in for another shock. In May, they learned that 13-year-old Nicholas – one of their four children – is in Stage 4 of a rare and aggressive form of cancer.

Rhabdomyosarcoma affects only 200 to 300 people a year.

Rick Worthington, news director for KBOI Radio in Boise, says both his wife and son are undergoing chemotherapy.

"Some days, they have them on the same day, and those are particularly difficult days for the family, and trying to figure out how to help both of them because when you have chemotherapy, there's a good chance you're not going to feel terrific the rest of the day," he relates.

The family has a GoFundMe page to help pay for medical expenses, and has received more than $27,000 so far. The website is gofundme.com/WorthingtonFamilyHealingFund.

Rick says the family has felt the kindness of the community since the tragedies struck. He says it's hard to juggle caring for two daughters, ages three and six, a 16-year-old son, work and all of life's other responsibilities. And as much as he wants to do it all, Rick says he's swallowed his pride and accepted offers of help.

"There have been a lot of people that have just, out of the blue, 'Hey, we want to come and clean your house this week,'” he relates. “I don't know where I would be without those people just popping up and saying, 'Hey, we're here to help.'"

Last week, the family traveled to Seattle Children's Hospital and met with one of the world's foremost experts on Nicholas's rare form of cancer. The doctor assured the Worthingtons that they're pursuing the same treatment plan he would pursue if Nicholas were in his care.


Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID