PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 5, 2021 


New rules should speed large-scale clean-energy projects in NY; Texas' Gov. Abbott tries to shift COVID blame to release of "immigrants."


2021Talks - March 5, 2021 


A marathon Senate session begins to pass COVID relief; Sanders plans a $15 minimum wage amendment; and work continues to approve Biden's cabinet choices.

Harmful Algae Blooms Flourishing in Long Island Waters

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

Every major bay and estuary on Long Island has been affected by algae blooms, oxygen depletion or both. (USEPA)
Every major bay and estuary on Long Island has been affected by algae blooms, oxygen depletion or both. (USEPA)
September 15, 2017

PATCHOGUE, N.Y. – Every major bay and estuary across Long Island has been affected by harmful algal blooms this year, according to a new report.

The annual water-quality assessment, released this week, says this year has been marked by shellfish poisoned by algae in May, the longest brown-tide bloom in history, toxic blue-green algae growing in 14 lakes, and more than 20 oxygen-depleted "dead zones" from Hempstead to East Hampton.

Doctor Christopher Gobler, a professor of marine biology at Stony Brook University, says the blooms are causing both environmental and economic damage.

"They've contributed towards the collapse of important fisheries and also have hindered existing populations of both fish and shellfish," he says.

State and county governments are dedicating significant resources to try to rein in nitrogen pollution from waste systems and fertilizers that accelerate the growth of algal blooms.

Gobler notes that Gov. Andrew Cuomo allocated $2.5 billion in this year's state budget to fund initiatives to address the problem.

"Initiatives to both expand sewer districts as well as replace old, on-site septic systems from homes with new and advanced systems that do a better job of removing nitrogen," he adds.

There is also an environmental protection fund of $300 million, and a $10 million shellfish restoration project.

Gobler points out even more is needed. There are half-a-million individual septic systems on Long Island that need to be upgraded or replaced, and failure to act would have dangerous consequences.

"The danger is that the situation will worsen and the blooms will become more prolific, more intense and their impacts more severe," he warns.

Andrea Sears, Public News Service - NY