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Hampton Roads Explores Cures For Heart Disease, Stroke

According to the American Heart Association. 2,300 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day, an average of one death every 38 seconds. (AHA)
According to the American Heart Association. 2,300 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day, an average of one death every 38 seconds. (AHA)
March 29, 2018

HAMPTON ROADS, Va. — The City of Hampton Roads is among seven communities across the country selected for an American Heart Association program where people can voluntarily share their personal medical information to help scientists find cures for common diseases.

"My Research Legacy" is a secure online patient-powered research network at the Heart Association's Institute for Precision Cardiovascular Medicine. It's taking a crowd-sourcing approach to tracking and finding ways to treat diseases, powered by people self-reporting through wearable devices, providing genetic information and sharing their medical records.

Dr. Jennifer Hall leads My Research Legacy, which she said is searching for cures for heart disease and stroke.

"It is really just a really simple way that you can be involved in a a research study, and understand a little bit more about your health and your risk of cardiovascular disease,” Hall said.

She said Hampton Roads was chosen because of its diversity. Other selected cities include Nashville, Seattle, and Columbus, Ohio. To learn more, or to join the program, visit myresearchlegacy.org.

A 2014 study showed 60 percent of people are willing to donate their data for research intended for the public good. Hall said they plan to engage 250,000 people through My Research Legacy in the next several years.

"So maybe there is great ideas that we can find, with understanding where people live, understand the way that they live their lives - what they eat, what they do in their free time,” she said.

Hall added those who commit to the program will know they're helping to find solutions to cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in the U.S.

Trimmel Gomes, Public News Service - VA