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PNS Daily Newscast - December 14, 2018 


The Senate votes to withdraw funding for the Saudi war in Yemen. Also on the Friday rundown: the Global Climate Conference reinforces the need for grassroots movements; and could this be the most wasteful time of year?

Daily Newscasts

As Climate Crisis Reaches 'Zero Hour,' Youths Take a Stand

Seattle high school student and event organizer Jamie Margolin wants the Zero Hour Youth Climate March to be an inclusive movement. (Zero Hour Seattle)
Seattle high school student and event organizer Jamie Margolin wants the Zero Hour Youth Climate March to be an inclusive movement. (Zero Hour Seattle)
July 20, 2018

SEATTLE – Young people around the world are standing up this Saturday to tell leaders to act on climate change before it's too late.

The Zero Hour Youth Climate March is being organized by Seattle high school student Jamie Margolin; she'll be leading the main march in Washington DC. Sister marches are planned for Seattle and Olympia.

Young people involved with the march say they are the ones that will inherit a planet damaged by climate change if something isn't done to stop it. Kendall Kieras is the communications director with Zero Hour Seattle Youth.

"We are here,” says Kieras. “We're asking for change and so the reason why we have so many marches around the world is to basically say that this is what youths are fighting for and we're not going to back down."

The Seattle rally will begin at Garfield Community Center Playfield at 9 a.m. and folks will march at 10:30 a.m.. In Olympia, the march begins at 11 a.m. at Heritage Park.

On Thursday, youths across the country held an official lobby day, speaking with elected leaders. Today, they're holding an art and community building event in preparation for the march.

Organizers are striving to make this movement inclusive. Talia Glick, social media director with the Zero Hour campaign, also is from Seattle, but she'll be in the nation's capital for Saturday's march. She says it's important that minority and poor communities lead this movement because they live on the front lines of climate change in disproportionate numbers.

"Within the climate movement, a lot of times people with positions that are relatively privileged are the ones whose voices are heard,” says Glick. “But it's really important to us that the frontline communities are the voice of the movement."

At the Seattle march, a Native American speaker will tell youths about the potential impact on Washington state from British Columbia's proposed Trans Mountain pipeline. About 20 sister marches are planned across the country.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - WA