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PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2018 


Lawyer Michael Avenatti arrested on a domestic violence charge. Also on the Thursday rundown: More testimony on Ohio's "anti-protest" bill; and we'll take you to the Dakotas to celebrate American Education Week.

Daily Newscasts

ACLU Report Card: Civil Rights, Liberties Under Fire in NC

A new law in North Carolina allows law enforcement the ability to review your entire history of drug prescriptions if you're under investigation  a law that the ACLU opposed. (ep_jhu/flickr)
A new law in North Carolina allows law enforcement the ability to review your entire history of drug prescriptions if you're under investigation a law that the ACLU opposed. (ep_jhu/flickr)
September 4, 2018

RALEIGH, N.C. – While thousands of Americans enjoyed a day off from work Monday for Labor Day, it's the work done by North Carolina’s General Assembly in the last legislative sessions that has civil rights activists concerned.

Specifically, the ACLU of North Carolina gives the Tar Heel State low marks for pushing forward legislation that included limits to voting access, LGBTQ equality, privacy rights and more.

"The ACLU of North Carolina has found that the North Carolina General Assembly continues to attack the civil rights and civil liberties of all North Carolinians, from privacy and voting access to LGBT equality and immigrant rights,” points out Sarah Gillooly, director of political strategy and advocacy for the ACLU of North Carolina. “All of our rights are under attack in the General Assembly."

The report highlights six pieces of legislation, five of which were opposed by the ACLU.

While the Voter ID Amendment and Act limiting access to early voting have received much attention, one other lesser known new law allows law enforcement to access your entire history of drug prescriptions if you're under investigation.

Gillooly says it's important to note that civil rights are not a matter of red or blue.

"These votes are not partisan issues,” she stresses. “When you look at the votes from both Republicans and Democrats, we see legislators attacking the civil rights and civil liberties of all North Carolinians."

One law that does have the ACLU's support is one that raises the age of juvenile jurisdiction so that 16- and 17-year-olds who are charged with minor felonies and misdemeanors are not charged as adults. North Carolina was the last state to adopt such a law.

Stephanie Carson, Public News Service - NC