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PNS Daily Newscast - December 14, 2018 


The Senate votes to withdraw funding for the Saudi war in Yemen. Also on the Friday rundown: the Global Climate Conference reinforces the need for grassroots movements; and could this be the most wasteful time of year?

Daily Newscasts

Immigrant Rights Groups: Hurting Parents Hurts Children

Proposed regulation from the Department of Homeland Security to make it harder for foreigners to come to the United States or stay here would affect more than 382,000 people per year who obtain permanent residence while already in the country. (Pixabay)
Proposed regulation from the Department of Homeland Security to make it harder for foreigners to come to the United States or stay here would affect more than 382,000 people per year who obtain permanent residence while already in the country. (Pixabay)
September 27, 2018

MADISON, Wis. – Immigrant rights groups say the Trump administration's proposed rule to deny visas and permanent residency to aspiring immigrants, who've legally accessed public benefits in the past, is cruel.

The proposed regulation from the Department of Homeland Security would expand immigration officers' powers to refuse entry to the U.S. if the immigrants previously received a range of taxpayer-funded benefits such as Medicaid, the Medicare Part D subsidy, Section 8 housing vouchers and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps.

William Parke-Sutherland, health policy engagement coordinator with the advocacy group Kids Forward, says the rule attacks families and hurts children.

"You know, this is really going to privilege wealthy families and put them ahead of families that have been waiting years to be reunited,” he points out. “This is unfair, it's unhealthy, and it doesn't represent the values that Americans claim to hold."

According to Parke-Sutherland, numerous organizations in the Protecting Immigrant and Families national campaign are waiting for the official rule to be posted to the Federal Register, which will trigger a 60-day public comment period.

The administration's proposal is a departure from current guidelines, which have been in place since 1999 and bars authorities from considering such non-cash benefits in deciding a person's eligibility to immigrate to the United States or stay in the country.

Parke-Sutherland says this has long been a goal for President Donald Trump.

"The Trump administration has been openly hostile to immigrants, immigrant families, and communities of color throughout the administration, and so this is another attack on that," he states.

The changes would apply to those seeking visas or legal permanent residency, but not people applying for U.S. citizenship.

Trimmel Gomes, Public News Service - WI