Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 22, 2019 


President Trump rattles the Middle East, saying the U.S. will recognize Israel’s authority over the Golan Heights. Also on our Friday rundown: A judge blocks laws limiting the power of the new Wisconsin governor. Plus, momentum builds across party lines to abolish the death penalty.

Daily Newscasts

Credit Unions Poised to Help Federal Workers During Shutdown

The government has been partially shutdown for three weeks, leaving federal employees furloughed or working without pay. (Phil Roeder/Flickr)
The government has been partially shutdown for three weeks, leaving federal employees furloughed or working without pay. (Phil Roeder/Flickr)
January 11, 2019

PORTLAND, Ore. – For federal employees, a dreaded a day in the government shutdown is upon them. Today is the first time in the shutdown that they won't receive a paycheck.

One place federal workers in the Northwest might look to as they juggle their budgets is their local credit union, as many are offering a few ways to help folks get through difficult times.

Lynn Heider, vice president of communications and public relations with the Northwest Credit Union Association, says credit unions can offer short-term, low-interest emergency loans as well as other options.

"Financial counseling, the opportunity to sit down with someone at the credit union and review your budget and see where you have options to save money,” says Heider. “And also, in many cases, an option to delay a loan payment – even on your mortgage or your car payment – and resume payments when the shutdown ends."

The shutdown has affected 9,800 employees in Oregon, according to the Washington Post. Nationwide, 380,000 federal employees have been furloughed and aren't working. Another 420,000 essential personnel, such as airport security workers, are on the job without pay.

Heider notes credit unions' not-for-profit, cooperative model lets them reinvest in members, which means they can offer lower interest rates and other services that can be especially important in tough times. But she points out that credit unions may not know which of their members are federal employees.

"So if you are, you should contact your credit union and let them know and then, find out what your options are,” says Heider. “And even if you're not a credit union member, reach out locally, see if you can join, and see what services might be available to help you through this difficult time."

The partial shutdown began on Dec. 22 and negotiations to end it have reached a stalemate so far over funding for a U.S.-Mexico border wall.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - OR