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President Trump visits California, targeting its homelessness crisis and environmental protections; and Tennessee is a top destination for out-of-state women seeking abortions.

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Interfaith Alliance's Connie Ryan and Family Leader's Bob Vander Plaats on their differing views of religion's role in politics; and former Rep. Mark Sanford confers with cardboard cutout of President Trump.

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Virginians on Alert After Capital One Data Breach

Bank account numbers for 80,000 secured credit-card customers, who typically have low credit scores or no credit history, were breached in a hack of Capital One customers. (Adobe Stock)
Bank account numbers for 80,000 secured credit-card customers, who typically have low credit scores or no credit history, were breached in a hack of Capital One customers. (Adobe Stock)
July 31, 2019

McLEAN, Va. – Capital One announced on Monday that a hacker accessed about 100 million credit-card applications filled out between 2005 and 2019. What if yours was among them?

The hacker also stole 140,000 Social Security numbers and 80,000 bank-account numbers. In the aftermath of the breach, cybersecurity expert Marty Puranik, chief executive of cloud-hosting company Atlantic.net, said folks need to be even more vigilant to protect against fraud and identity theft. He recommended signing up for an online service that provides credit monitoring.

"It will tell you how many inquiries are coming in against your credit," he said. "The reason that's important is, if you start seeing inquiries against your credit by companies you've never applied for a credit card with, then most likely somebody's trying to take advantage of your identity."

Puranik said it's also important to help family and friends who aren't as tech-savvy to make sure they take the same precautions.

McLean-based Capital One has 56 branches and dozens of ATMs across Virginia. The hack appears to be one of the largest data breaches ever to hit a financial services firm.

The data breach involved about 100 million people in the United States and 6 million in Canada. When it was announced, Capital One emphasized that no credit-card numbers or log-in credentials were compromised, but Puranik said that doesn't shield anyone from what is known as "secondary fraud."

"Nefarious people could also use this data to call, write, email you pretending to be an authority figure," he said, "trying to sell you credit monitoring or using the data that's already available to get additional data about you."

Puranik advised people never to give financial or identifying information to a stranger, and to only use official phone numbers for banks or credit cards from your credit monitoring service's website.

Capital One said the hacker was able to get such data as phone numbers, email addresses, dates of birth and self-reported income.

Diane Bernard, Public News Service - VA