PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - August 4, 2020 


Despite Trump threat, NV Gov. Sisolak signs expanded vote-by-mail into law; Trump wants Treasury to get percentage of any TikTok deal.


2020Talks - August 4, 2020 


Trump threatens Nevada with litigation for passing a bill to send ballots to all registered voters. Plus, primaries today in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and Washington.

Missouri West Nile Virus Threat Doesn’t End with Fall’s Arrival

Missouri DHSS updates its West Nile virus data through the end of October, even in years like this one when infections have been considered "light." (Unsplash)
Missouri DHSS updates its West Nile virus data through the end of October, even in years like this one when infections have been considered "light." (Unsplash)
September 13, 2019

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Mosquitoes trapped in Jefferson County have tested positive for the West Nile virus, according to scientists with the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

Even though fall is less than two weeks away, Molly Baker – a senior epidemiology specialist with DHSS – says people need to keep using insect repellent and wearing clothes that cover their exposed skin when they're outdoors.

Baker says it isn't time to relax.

"The transmission season definitely isn't over,” says Baker, “because it's not unusual for us to have cases reported to us through September and into October."

She says as long as temperatures remain well above freezing, mosquitoes will continue to be a pest-control problem as well as a health threat.

Missouri has averaged 20 West Nile virus cases per year over the last five years. Though no one has died this year, the state has averaged two fatalities each summer and fall.

The continuing threat of contracting the West Nile virus means people must take the necessary precautions to protect themselves. Getting rid of standing water on your property is a good first step.

Baker says that doesn't mean historic flooding in northern Missouri has made the problem worse.

"Floodwater mosquitoes are definitely a nuisance,” says Baker, “and they can be very aggressive biters, but they don't generally pose an increased risk for West Nile virus transmission."

The virus originates in birds and more than two dozen dead bird reports have been received by the DHSS in recent weeks. A great horned owl in Cole County tested positive last month.

Health officials say the majority of West Nile cases historically occur in late summer and early fall.

Dale Forbis, Public News Service - MO