PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 1, 2020 


Concern that Trump's Proud Boys comments could encourage "alt-right" groups; report finds key swing states went into manufacturing decline pre-pandemic.


2020Talks - October 1, 2020 


Experts are concerned about white supremacist violence leading up to the election. And, the Presidential Debate Commission says they plan to change rules after Trump's almost constant interruptions.

AARP Poll: 95% Women 50+ Likely to Vote in 2020

In a new poll sponsored by AARP, more than half of older women voters said they had an unfavorable view of national leadership. (Jessica Whittle Photography/Creative Commons)
In a new poll sponsored by AARP, more than half of older women voters said they had an unfavorable view of national leadership. (Jessica Whittle Photography/Creative Commons)
December 30, 2019

CONCORD, N.H. - According to a new Harris poll sponsored by AARP, 95% of women 50 and older say they're likely to vote in the 2020 presidential election.

While older women are expected to be a reliable voting bloc, 7 out of 10 say they still don't know who they're going to vote for. AARP New Hampshire state director Todd Fahey reflected on the significance of this uncertainty for the Granite State.

"In a state like New Hampshire with a first-in-the-nation primary, with some 40-plus percent of the population declared independents, it's a pretty important number," Fahey said.

The women polled also said they prefer an experienced candidate over one with a new approach. According to the survey, the top issue for older women voters is health care, particularly its high cost.

Fahey explained how the high price of health care impacts older women.

"Most of them continue to struggle with the cost of health care," he said. "Three in 10 have had to skip medical care because it was too expensive; 4 in 10 can't afford to pay for their health care, and 7 in 10 feel that older people pay too much for health care comparison to others."

The respondents are also more likely than the male respondents to say the economy is on the wrong track and isn't working for them. Other high priorities among older women voters include the opioid epidemic, prices rising faster than income, college affordability and the future of Social Security.

The poll was conducted online in November and surveyed close to 2,000 women across the country.

Disclosure: AARP New Hampshire contributes to our fund for reporting on Budget Policy & Priorities, Health Issues, Senior Issues. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.
Laura Rosbrow-Telem, Public News Service - NH