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Council of Churches Aims to Help NC Residents Understand Health-Care Issues

The North Carolina Council of Churches is comprised of 26 church judicatories from 18 denominations statewide. (Facebook)
The North Carolina Council of Churches is comprised of 26 church judicatories from 18 denominations statewide. (Facebook)
February 27, 2020

RALEIGH, N.C. - One of the state's largest religious organizations celebrates its 85th anniversary this year and is turning its focus toward helping North Carolinians access affordable health care.

The North Carolina Council of Churches' Executive Director Jennifer Copeland says this year the council aims to educate communities on health-care issues.

"What we want to do is connect people in their local communities with the resources they already have," says Copeland. "While, at the same time, helping to educate them about what will be the primary issues around their own health care in the November election."

North Carolina has one of the largest uninsured populations in the country, and according to the most recent census data, more than one million residents live without health insurance. A significant portion are employed, but are unable to receive coverage through their employer.

Copeland says since its inception in 1935, the council has led the state's congregations on issues such as racial justice, climate change and livable wages.

"I would say that the council has offered a place for our churches to be engaged, when maybe it wouldn't be popular in their own communities," says Copeland. "Or for church leaders sometimes it wouldn't be popular in their own congregations, but the council can carry the banner on their behalf."

The North Carolina Council of Churches will be hosting 85th anniversary events across the state in the coming months, including in Wilmington, Greenville, Greensboro, Charlotte, Asheville and Durham.

Disclosure: North Carolina Council of Churches contributes to our fund for reporting on Environment, Hunger/Food/Nutrition, Immigrant Issues, Social Justice. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.
Nadia Ramlagan, Public News Service - NC