Friday, July 23, 2021

Play

More than 10,000 NY and NJ airport workers will get health insurance as part of new contract negotiations; and Dr. Jill Biden is in Tokyo for the Olympic Games.

Play

Drama builds over who will serve on the House January 6th panel; Senate tries to hold tech accountable for COVID misinformation; and VP Harris promotes a path to citizenship for Dreamers.

Shaw Creek River Restoration Project Helps Veterans Heal

Play

Tuesday, May 12, 2020   

HENDERSONVILLE, N.C. -- A river-restoration project on a farm for veterans in Hendersonville is bringing new life to a community space.

Veterans Healing Farm began in 2013 as a way to support the emotional and social well-being of returning service members, who use the land to grow food, herbs and flowers. The farm's executive director, John Mashie, said repeated floods had caused the banks along Shaw Creek to become severely eroded, so he teamed up with local conservation organization Resource Institute and the Henderson Soil and Water Conservation District to restore the stream.

Mashie said flowing water is naturally healing for veterans transitioning back from military life.

"The creek is multifaceted in terms of what it created," Mashie said. "One is the sound of the water as it flows over some of these various features; obviously, to see the water, to have an open area that they can sit next to the water. Additionally, the entire creek is planted with elderberry that is going to be used to create medicine."

Research has shown spending time in nature can improve the psychological well-being of veterans struggling with depression, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and other serious health problems. North Carolina is home to more than 700,000 veterans.

Senior Water Resources Engineer at Wildlands Engineering Jake McLean said eroding stream banks can lead to land loss and reduced crop production and can harm aquatic life.

"That's sending sediment downstream - places where there's mussels and other organisms that get smothered out with sediment," McLean said.

He said as part of the restoration work, veterans helped plant more than 3,000 native plants and shrubs alongside the creek.

Reporting by North Carolina News Connection in association with Media in the Public Interest and funded in part by the Park Foundation.


get more stories like this via email

While most electricity in Utah is generated by gas or coal-powered plants, one regional utility is considering the nuclear option. (brianguest/Adobe Stock)

Environment

SALT LAKE CITY -- In the push toward carbon-free energy production, some cities in Utah and nearby states are considering a new type of nuclear …


Health and Wellness

TAMPA, Fla. -- Move United's USA Wheelchair Football League is expanding from four cities to nine, including Tampa, to give athletes with …

Environment

CRAIG, Colo. -- What would it look like if one in four households in the country was solar-powered? A new report from the "30 Million Solar Homes" …


According to the American Heart Association, one in five cardiac arrests occurs in public, such as on a job site. (Adobe Stock)

Health and Wellness

DES MOINES, Iowa -- People across the Midwest, including Iowans, have dealt with a series of heat waves this summer. Health experts say hotter …

Social Issues

NEW YORK -- Over 10,000 New York and New Jersey front-line airport workers will get health insurance as part of new contract negotiations that come at…

More than 400 laws have been introduced this year that would restrict voting rights across the country. (Lakshmiprasad/Adobe Stock)

Social Issues

INDIANAPOLIS -- Voting-rights advocates applaud this week's federal appeals-court decision to prevent Indiana from purging some voters from the rolls …

Environment

BOSTON -- A new survey finds widespread public support up and down the East Coast for protecting right whales from getting tangled up in fishing gear…

Environment

CARSON CITY, Nev. - A bill just introduced in the U.S, Senate would help thousands of species stay off the Endangered Species List - including …

 

Phone: 303.448.9105 Toll Free: 888.891.9416 Fax: 208.247.1830 Your trusted member and audience-supported news source since 1996 Copyright 2021