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PNS Daily Newscast - October 28, 2020 


A technical error rejected your ballot? Take action. Plus, doctors sound off on harmful health impacts of tailpipe emissions.


2020Talks - October 28, 2020 


The window is closing to mail ballots in states like GA, MI and WI that require them to be received before Election Day. Experts recommend going in-person if possible.

Oregonians 'Go Zero' for Sustainable Building Week

The technology already exists to make Oregon homes completely sustainable, but not everyone knows how to get it. (Theresa Hogue/Oregon State University)
The technology already exists to make Oregon homes completely sustainable, but not everyone knows how to get it. (Theresa Hogue/Oregon State University)
October 9, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Next week, Oregonians will get a peek into the greener future of homes.

Monday is the start of the third annual Sustainable Building Week, kicking off a series of events happening virtually this year.

It includes a virtual "Go Zero" tour of Oregon homes that produce as much energy as they consume.

Zach Snyder, program manager for Solar Oregon, said residential buildings consume one-quarter of all the energy used in Oregon.

"What's so great is that the technology for 'zero-energy' homes, which could reduce the huge amount of energy that we consume in residential buildings, is already here," Snyder explained.

He noted solar energy plays an important role in sustainability, as well as energy-efficiency measures.

Sustainable Building Week actually features two weeks of events highlighting technology that can help homeowners and renters reduce their home's carbon footprint.

The growing effects from climate change are driving conversations about zero-energy homes. Snyder said that's especially true in Oregon after the wildfire-ravaged summer.

"I know that climate is at the forefront more and more of the public mind," Snyder observed. "And the fires definitely have created a sense of urgency because they were particularly devastating this year."

Snyder added the green economy also is creating jobs. According to the Solar Foundation, there were more than 3,700 solar jobs in Oregon in 2019, growing more than 2.5% from the previous year.

Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - OR