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PNS Daily Newscast - November 25, 2020 


Feeding hungry families, on Thanksgiving and beyond; and is that turkey really from a family farm? (Note to Broadcasters: The newscast has been granted a holiday for Thanksgiving, but we'll return first thing Friday.)


2020Talks - November 25, 2020 


CORRECTED 2:30pm MST 11/25 - Linda Thomas-Greenfield would be the second Black woman in US UN Ambassador role, Susan Rice was the first. Biden nominees speak; how can social media spread less misinformation and be less polarizing. *2020Talks will not be released 11/26 & 11/27*

Question 2: The Pros and Cons of Ranked-Choice Voting

Proponents of ranked-choice voting say a side benefit is that it discourages negative campaigning, since voters can rank more than one candidate in their order of preference. (Tom Ruen/Wikimedia Commons)
Proponents of ranked-choice voting say a side benefit is that it discourages negative campaigning, since voters can rank more than one candidate in their order of preference. (Tom Ruen/Wikimedia Commons)
October 21, 2020

BOSTON -- At this election, Massachusetts will consider ranked-choice voting starting in 2022.

If it's approved, Question 2 would mean that voters rank the candidates in order of preference. If no one gets a majority of first-choice votes, the lowest-ranked candidate is eliminated and their voters' second choices would be redistributed until a candidate in the race gets the support of 50% plus one.

Kristina Mensik, assistant director of Common Cause Massachusetts, said this system would reduce the "spoiler effect" so people can vote for a third party without handing the election to the candidate they dislike.

"It reduces the kind of trade-off considerations that voters make," she said. "Rather than supporting their true favorite candidate, they feel they have to support a candidate who has a better chance."

Opponents have said ranked-choice voting is too complicated, and noted that it eliminates runoff elections, which denies voters a second chance to evaluate the top contenders. Mensik said the new system would ensure the winner has the broadest support, rather than the votes of the most fervent minority. She said ranked-choice voting favors more moderate -- or less extreme -- candidates and also discourages negative campaigning.

"You have candidates who are competing not just for a first-place position," she said, "but also working to be somebody's second- or third-choice candidate."

Ranked-choice voting is used now in municipal elections in Cambridge and in dozens of other cities across the country. This year, Maine is the first state to use it in a presidential election.

More information about Question 2 is online at voterchoice2020.org/ballot-text/.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - MA