PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 2, 2021 


Human rights advocates applaud Biden's policy to reunite immigrant children separated from parents; pivotal SCOTUS arguments today on Voting Rights Act.


2021Talks - March 2nd, 2021 


President Biden meets with Mexican President Lopez Obrador; DHS Secretary Mayorkas says separated immigrant families may be able to stay in U.S.; and Sen. Elizabeth Warren introduces legislation for a wealth tax.

UW Prof: Staying with Unity Theme Crucial for Biden

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

The University of Wisconsin's Dr. Allison Prasch is a scholar of U.S. presidential rhetoric, foreign policy and the Cold War. (University of Wisconsin)
The University of Wisconsin's Dr. Allison Prasch is a scholar of U.S. presidential rhetoric, foreign policy and the Cold War. (University of Wisconsin)
January 19, 2021

MADISON, Wis. -- As Joe Biden assumes office this week, he'll appeal to a nation facing multiple crises.

But a Wisconsin professor who studies presidential speeches believes Wednesday's inauguration could be a launching point for promoting a resilient democracy, not just the person taking over.

Biden has tried to focus on unity in light of a contentious election in which President Donald Trump issued discredited claims about voter fraud.

That led to his supporters storming the Capitol, along with polls indicating many Republicans still not acknowledging Biden's win.

Allison Prasch, assistant professor of communication studies at the University of Wisconsin, said Biden could establish some healing by sticking with unity and restoring faith in democracy, and not putting attention on himself.

"He is the spokesman for democracy, but he is not the definition of what our democracy is," Prasch clarified.

She remarked that it compares with Trump's rhetoric of one person being the focal point of government.

Beyond the inauguration, Prasch contended Biden's actions in this area could help cement some healing. She added he could also win over support by staying honest about the state of the pandemic, the economic struggles facing many Americans, and the need for accountability related to the riots.

Prasch noted past presidents, such as Thomas Jefferson and John F. Kennedy, emphasized a shared national identity when facing partisan divides, resulting in some success in healing. She added even though some voters won't accept Biden as the winner, a president's words still matter for all the electorate.

"The president sets a rhetorical example," Prasch described. "They set the tone for other political discourse."

She theorized a tone that's focused on unity could trickle down to lower levels of government, and suggested it could benefit states such as Wisconsin, which has divided leadership in state government, as well as areas that have strongly supported Trump and others that condemn his rhetoric.

Mike Moen, Public News Service - WI