PNS National Newscast

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the Public News Service (podcast)"
"Hey Google, play the Public News Service podcast"
"Alexa, play Public News Service podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

2020Talks

Audio Activation
"Siri, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Hey Google, play the 2020Talks podcast"
"Alexa, play Two-Thousand-Twenty Talks podcast"
or "Alexa, what's my news flash?" once you set it up in the Alexa app

Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 15, 2021 


President Biden sets a date certain to end America's longest war, and more information could be the decider for some reluctant to get the COVID vaccine.


2021Talks - April 15, 2021 


With overwhelming bipartisan support, the Senate takes up anti-Asian American hate crimes legislation, and President Biden officially announces a full military withdrawal from Afghanistan.

NH Unions Oppose Renewed Push For 'Right-to-Work' Bill

Downloading Audio

Click to download

We love that you want to share our Audio! And it is helpful for us to know where it is going.
Media outlets that are interested in downloading content should go to www.newsservice.org
Click Here if you do not already have an account and need to sign up.
Please do it now, as the option to download our audio packages is ending soon

New Hampshire lawmakers are bringing the first right-to-work bill since the 2017 Supreme Court ruling which banned requiring membership in public-sector unions. (Zack Frank/Adobe Stock)
New Hampshire lawmakers are bringing the first right-to-work bill since the 2017 Supreme Court ruling which banned requiring membership in public-sector unions. (Zack Frank/Adobe Stock)
 By Lily Bohlke, Public News Service - NH - Producer, Contact
February 2, 2021

CONCORD, N.H. -- Union leaders in New Hampshire are opposing some GOP state lawmakers' hopes to pass so-called "right-to-work" legislation for private-sector unions this session, Senate Bill 61.

The last 40 years have brought multiple attempts to ban collective-bargaining agreements that require workers to join the union and pay dues, even though the unions continue to represent them in negotiations.

Proponents of right-to-work say it promotes worker choice.

Rick Gelinas, a natural-gas utility employee and member of United Steelworkers 12012 for more than 30 years, said it's about undermining organized labor.

"This is about making it harder for unions to obtain the resources they need to negotiate good, fair wages and benefits for workers," Gelinas contended.

Some proponents also claim the bill would attract new manufacturing companies to the state. But studies by the Economic Policy Institute have found similar laws in other states have little to no positive impact on job growth.

Research shows that right-to-work laws tend to lower wages and weaken workplace protections over time, because they reduce the bargaining power of unions by making it more difficult to financially sustain themselves.

Gelinas emphasized all of New Hampshire's workers benefit from union negotiations.

"This will hurt all workers, not just union people, because it will serve to depress wages," Gelinas argued.

Although similar bills have been defeated multiple times in New Hampshire, Republicans now control the governor's office, the state Senate and the state House.

And it's the first time right-to-work has been introduced in the Granite State since the landmark 2017 U.S. Supreme Court ruling which banned requiring membership in public-sector unions.

Best Practices